Training session of Development Committees (DCs) of Anglophone Provinces in Africa.


Kampala 01BBy Jos Kuppens, M.Afr

I was asked to try and record in the form of an article what we have been going through here in Kampala, close to the place where young Kizito, Charles Lwanga and  companions and  Mapera were walking, praying, suffering and gave their life.

So, what to start with? The reality that we as a group of missionaries are slowly living on our reserves to survive? A bit like sheep in winter, having eaten all summer and having built up reserves the sheep will, to a large extent, live on these reserves in winter. Or that in quite a few communities we are able to take care of ourselves using the income produced by our various ministries? Or the initiative of raising rabbits in the community where I live (they do multiply as rabbits!! following a now famous quote). Or the last Chapter where our confrere capitulants raised the alarm on the fact that we need to ensure that we can continue our mission well into the future by becoming proactive in looking for resources and start Income Generating Projects (IPGs).

Our last Chapter charged the General Council to look into Income Generating Initiatives / Projects for the society. Not that nothing was ever done in this regard. We have had initiatives that were mainly centred in the Northern Hemisphere. More recently we have had some initiatives in Africa that operated on a trial and error basis, while some were quite successful. But more often than not the enthusiasm about starting such projects was high but was not matched by corresponding success rates. Hence the need for a more professional approach. Thus the calling into being of a team of confreres (mainly treasurers) who worked with experts in the field of Project Management for Income Generation Projects. They produced a book of guidelines to steer our Income Generation Projects on a more professional course. Using this resource book (Guidelines for ), about 20 of us coming from various Anglophone Provinces in Africa were ‘workshopped’ into the rather complex matter of the Income Generation Projects cycle, using the concrete example of construction of hostel.

The Three phased approach

We were taken through three different phases. They seem very logical and simple. Planning, Implementing of plans and operating the result of our effort: the planned building. In the diocese where I am now the Christians have decided to start a project to build a cathedral. They have decided to do it professionally. The workshop in Kampala has helped me to understand a bit better what it means to work professionally to construct a building as it did for all the participants.

Phase one

What is it that we are supposed to do? All together as missionaries of Africa we need to wake up to the fact that things are not the same as they used to be. At all times there seemed to be enough funding to do our work, to train our candidates, to venture into new missionary challenges. Well, that time is definitely finished.  So all of us are asked to do the needful, like: budget, implement budgets, raise funds to meet the shortfalls, generally to live more according to our means.

So this common effort will underlie all of the other efforts for which the society has now put in place Development Committees, at the level of the Sectors and the Province, with, in the future, a coordinating office in Rome.

The Sector Council will appoint two members to the Sector Development Committee (SDC) to work with the confrere who is part of the provincial development committee and participated in the training. In order to help all of us in our Sectors to be part and parcel of this process, some mini seminars will be organized at the occasion of Sector Assemblies. This will assist in understanding the basics of managing IGPs and in finding some of the opportunities and potential ideas for IGPs. This will help the SDCs to identify some projects in their Sector. These should be developed up to a point where it will be clear that the eventual income is worth the investment. These committees will work on the following points:

  • Is the idea sound, has it been tried elsewhere; how does it fit in with our lifestyle?
  • What are the competitive advantages, its potential and uniqueness?
  • What are the project goals?
  • Who are the beneficiaries?
  • Map out the stakeholders/ competitors/ operators.
  • Point out the potential risks/ success factors.
  • Included a rough draft of what it will cost.

 The end result of this will be cast in the form of a Draft Concept Paper in which already some analysis is done and the project classification of the IGP is also determined. The Sector council will look at this concept, have its input and approve it to be sent to the Provincial Development Committee (PDC). There it will be examined and worked on further in order to send it to the Provincial Treasurer and Provincial Council.  They in turn will examine the draft concept and after deliberation (with some possible modifications) approve it to be sent to the General Treasurer and the Financial Council in Rome. Once reviewed, it will go to the General Council. The General Council will be the one to either approve the concept or shelve/ archive it.

If approved

They will give it the “Go for Plan” signal. We are speaking about potential projects between 150 and 500 thousand Euro.

In depth planning

It will now be the task of the PDC to go deeper into the planning stage. The GC will release a small budget to assist in the planning because it will involve hiring the expertise needed to do a professional plan.

In the ‘Go for Plan’ stage the already gathered information will be further worked out and new documents will be added. One of the main ones is a Business Plan, which includes a market survey and financial projection. Ownership, administration, organization are mapped out. Risks are analysed.   A detailed explanation of all this can be found in the new guidelines. All these preparations are done to give the PC, Treasurer General and his Financial Council and the GC all the tools they need to actually give the final go ahead or shelve it. As one can see little or nothing is left to chance.

The ‘Go / or No Go’

Kampala 02CFirst of all the decision will be published. If the project is approved a project team is setup. Accounts are created. A project structure is elaborated. A project manager may be appointed. (Sub)-Contractors will be found. Contracts will be negotiated. All this is then submitted to a thorough scrutiny which in the planning lingo is called a ‘quality gate’. If it passes here the project is now ready for Phase 2: the implementation stage.

If the decision is ‘no go’ all results are archived, all activities and accounts are closed. Documentation submitted to GC.

Phase two: the implementation stage

Most likely the Project Committee will now become the Management Committee. They are responsible to see to it that the Project Manager has all he needs. Legal experts may need to be involved. Risks need to be shared equally between contractors and MAFrs. Sub-contractors will agree to delivery dates, work out more concrete plans. Efforts are made to create a good understanding between all those involved so they communicate properly and at regular intervals.

It is now important to control the project. The actual versus planned status of the project is regularly worked out. This includes use of resources, use of budget. In all this the Project Manager, (Financial Manager, Quality and Risk Manager, if needed for the project) and the Project Management Committee divide the work.

Reporting up to the Treasurer General is required when the variance of actual expenditure with the budget exceeds 10 %. When the project has been finalised all accounts are closed.

The last ‘quality gate’ is the handover of the finished project (building, hostel, etc.) to the operator who has been identified already even in Phase 1.

 This leads us to the Third Phase which is the operation of the project.

Phase Three: successful operation of the project

The final points that need attention are shared with the Operational Team. All documentation is also shared with them as well as technical know-how such as maintenance schedules and warranties. The Management Committee and the Operational Committee visit the site together and finally the handover can be done with some sort of celebration.

The Provincial Treasurer will now be in charge of supervising the operations but may delegate the Provincial Delegate or the Treasurer Delegate. Now on a yearly basis the operational profit will for 80% go to the province, while 20% will be saved for maintenance and repairs.

Kampala 08BConclusion

The project journey has been painstakingly prepared, implemented and the success rate should be high. In other words our IGP guidelines are of a quality that should guarantee a good success rate. The future of our mission will in that way be better guaranteed than it is now. At the end of the workshop the participants in the workshop were still apprehensive about the complexity of the whole cycle, but did give their wholehearted approval to the process and started already to plan how to implement it in each Province.

In the place, which is steeped in history and tradition of the best kind, the place of martyrdom of the martyrs of Uganda, the same Society of Missionaries of Africa that brought father ‘Mapera’ to Uganda, started charting a new course to support the very same Mission that was crowned by the faith of the martyrs.

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Project Cycle Meeting in Kampala

Diary of a journey to Egypt from September 28 to October 10, 2017.


By Archbishop George Daniel and Fr Christophe Boyer, M.Afr

Christophe Boyer2In 1992, Bishop Anthonios Markos started the Coptic Orthodox Church in Johannesburg. Archbishop George Daniel met him in 1993 and since became his friend. A reason is that there are many struggling independent churches in South Africa but the Coptic Church is truly African since the beginning. They could learn from it. The Egyptian government organised a Forum of Heavenly Religions in Sharm El Sheikh, Sinai on September 28-30, 2017. They asked Bishop Markos to send somebody from South Africa and he selected Archbishop Daniel. He accepted to visit Egypt but it was said that he needs a companion to deal with the challenges of such a journey. I accepted with joy to accompany him.

At Novotel, we met an Austrian professor, a German journalist for Germany and an Algerian journalist for Russia, a priest and an imam from South Sudan, an imam from Mali, another imam Pakistani residing in Ireland. We went directly to the Conference Palace. Soldiers surrounded it. They were meant especially for the government officials: most of them left with them. It is a big conference centre. Participants might have been around 2,000 people. Personalities started speaking only in Arabic. There was a simultaneous translation on earphones. The one of the Archbishop did not work… The theme was tourism and religion.

In a context of terrorism there are fewer tourists in Egypt. So tourism needs promotion.  Sinai is beautiful for its mountains and the Red Sea. It offers climbing, diving and therapeutic facilities. Especially it’s the place of the burning bush and of the 10 commandments revelation to Moses. Statistics show that religious tourism is more regular than others especially in front of terrorism. There is need to improve the roads and communications… South Sinai Governor came with Antiquities Minister and other officials. An evangelical bishop praised the government for authorising the building of a church… Muslim scholars of Al Azhar University were there beside churches’ leaders but no Jews, all in religious clothes. During tea time we could speak with a few bishops especially the Coptic Catholic Bishop and the local Catholic Coptic parish priest (ex Comboni student in Zambia), an evangelical bishop, the nuncio and his secretary… A Christian tour operator proposed her services for pilgrimages… We finished by a magnificent lunch around 15:00 which is normal time in the Middle East. We inaugurated a beautiful mosque in the evening. We had dinner with conference people on the flank of a mountain above the town centre, there was an orchestra…

On Friday morning we took a plane to St Catherine Monastery. We got a bedroom at Morgen Land hotel, the only one of the small town. Again military presence was heavy. The monastery was small for the big crowd of the conference. It needs restoration: paintings are dark and many things are worn out. We were told they are working on it. The oldest manuscripts of the bible are there but in the crowd we lost track of the Texan monk who was ready to show us the library. It is the oldest continuously occupied monastery and library… The name St Catherine of Alexandria was given by some Crusaders. A living thorn bush represents the burning bush… We stopped at the foot of the mountain thought to be of the Ten Commandments revelation but had no time to climb it…

In the evening, in front of the illuminated mountains, there was a beautiful UNESCO rather religious singing concert with singers from 15 countries… some Christians other Muslims… It was about peace and love…The introductory speech sounded a bit too nationalistic and pompous. It is understandable in the context of terrorism: Egypt is stronger than Islamism. An English-speaking Bedouin spoke with us critically of the government.

We believe that the aim should be a reconciliation between different religions. Tourism in the Middle East can be a tool.

I thank Bishop Markos and the Coptic Church in Egypt for allowing this wonderful trip to Egypt with the visit of key positions in vibrant mid-east Churches, parishes, famous shrines and monasteries and even of Alexandria, Giza and National Museum with good guides. The warmth of the people, their conversation and the good food compensated largely the honking and chaotic traffic, heavy schedule and airport lack of communication and utilities.

Coptic priest killedLet us pray for the late Coptic priest Fr Samaan Shehte murdered on October 12, 2017, that his death may contribute for peace and justice in this divided world.

Sedos Residential Seminar May 2 to 6, 2016 – Arricia, Rome.


I took part last May in a seminar organised by SEDOS (Centre of Documentation and Study) in Rome.  We were 120 participants made up of priests, religious men and women from all five continents.  Four Missionaries of Africa participated in the seminar: Denis Pam from Rwanda, Filiyanus Ekka from India, Frank Rossmann from Germany, and Boris Yabre from Mozambique. Two Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of Africa were as well among us.

SEDOS RESIDENTIAL SEMINAR 2016 - Arricia, RomeThe world is in constant pain, torn by divisions, violence, wars and mutual rejection, cultural and religious tensions. This has brought about the theme of the seminar: Interculturality: Living and Mission.

Inspired and helped by some erudite guess speakers from Italy, Japan, Cameroon, India, United States and Peru, we have come to better understand that interculturality, rather than an issue, is an opportunity.  It is a golden chance to go beyond oneself in order to learn, share, love and grow.

We need to move away from our egocentrism tendencies and learn to appreciate “cultural relativism”. Thus, it should be admitted that no culture is superior or inferior to another. “Rather, we could say that every culture is unique and none of them can be identified with another one. Every identity presupposes diversity which remains the starting point for intercultural dialogue and communication between cultures.” Indeed, every culture is a gift from God not only to a specific group but to be cherished by the whole humanity. Each culture is unique and should not be undermined. Put together, cultures in their diversities make up a common richness to be enjoyed by the whole world.

Interculturality is an evangelical necessity whereby conversion of the heart, the mind and the will are needed as experience shows how conflictual can be our intercultural religious communities. That implies widening continuously our horizons and making steps toward the other with the unique intention of knowing and giving a space that is due to that person.

Personality and interculturality are to be reconciled and balanced in the practice of community living. We may belong to the same cultural background and yet we have different personalities. The danger appears when someone judges an entire culture from one’s subjective experience from an individual belonging to this particular culture.

Boris-Yabre-2015The SEDOS seminar was excellent. It was a moment to experience our unity within the diversity inside the Church and in the world. The leaders of our little missionary Society thought well of sending four of us to take part in it. We are happy and grateful. We shall try our best to put into practice what our ears have heard.

Someone once sang, “different colours, one people”. I want to add, “different cultures, one people”.

Boris Yabre, M.Afr, Mozambique

Two Guest speakers visiting Zambia in May 2016


In collaboration with the Presentation Sisters, the Zambia Association of Sisterhood (ZAS) and the Association of Men Religious in Zambia (ARMS) are inviting you to attend two prestigious conferences.

Religious Life in an evolving Universe.

Gail WorceloSr. Gail Warcelo, SGM, Green Mountain Monastery, USA.

Date: Saturday 21st May 2016 from 08.30 till 15.30 hrs. Venue: International Spirituality Centre at the Christian Brothers opposite the roundabout leading to the airport. Please, bring your packed lunch. Morning and afternoon teas will be provided.

Gail Worcelo is a Catholic sister and co-founder of Green Mountain Monastery in Greensboro, Vermont USA, along with Bernadette Bostwick and the late Passionist priest, cultural historian and Teilhardian scholar Thomas Berry.  

Green Mountain Monastery is a new emergence in the Catholic tradition that seeks to give expression to a theology rooted in the evolutionary dynamism of an unfolding universe.

Gail holds degrees in Clinical Psychology and Christian Spirituality and divides her time between life at the monastery and teaching and leading retreats around the world.

She is passionate about contributing to the evolution of the Catholic tradition in this new “Moment of Grace” and has presented at gatherings such as: LCWR- The Leadership Conference of Women Religious, Catholic Theological Union, International Congregational Chapters of Men and Women, Catholic Theological Union, as well as to groups, seminaries and formation houses in India, Indonesia, Ireland, Australia and Latin America.

Gail finds inspiration in the great role Catholic sisters have played in the evolution of consciousness and culture throughout the ages and is interested in contributing to the revival of women’s religious life by encouraging women to take on this vital dimension of the tradition.

Trends in Religious Life. 

Patricia Murray 2Sr. Pat Murray IBVM, Executive Director of UISG, former Executive Director of Solidarity with South Sudan.

Date: Saturday, 28th May 2016 from 08.30 till 15.30 hrs. Venue: International Spirituality Centre at the Christian Brothers opposite the roundabout leading to the airport. Please, bring your packed lunch. Morning and afternoon teas will be provided.

Executive Secretary of UISG

UISG – On April 1st 2014, Sr. Patricia Murray (Dublin, 1947) assumed the position of Executive Secretary of the International Union of the Superiors General. Sr. Pat, a religious of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Loreto Sisters), has a Master’s degree in both Education and Theology and a Doctorate in Practical Theology. She has been a member of the General Council of her congregation and was the former Executive Director of Solidarity with South Sudan.

Climaxing the Year Dedicated to Consecrated Life in Ghana.


John Mubanga in KumasiBy Fr. John C. Mubanga (M.Afr) – St. Benedict’s Parish – Wa.

From the 20th till 23rd January, 2016, John Mubanga, Dieudonné Amani, Dominic Apee, Gaspard Cirimwani, Gazena Haile, and Erus Tirkey celebrated the climax of the Year Dedicated to Consecrated Life on behalf of the Missionaries of Africa in Ghana/Nigeria Province in Kumasi, the second largest towns in Ghana. The theme was the one given by Pope Francis: “Wake up the World.” Views and sharing helped the participants to find ways to bring peace, joy and love to our contemporary world as religious men and women.

Gabriel Justice Yaw AnokyeThe celebration was organised by the conference of Major Superiors of Religious in Ghana whose president is Dominic Apee (Provincial of M.Afr Ghana/Nigeria). In his opening remarks, he welcomed everybody and most especially Most Rev. Emmanuel Kofi Fianu, SVD, Bishop of Ho Diocese, and Archbishop Gabriel Justice Yaw Anokye of the Archdiocese of Kumasi. Dominic reminded each one of us that “consecrated life is a gift given by Christ who chooses a person to respond to his great love in a special relationship. Consecrated life is a vocation in which men and women give witness to Christ by following his teaching. Consecrated life is most often shared in a community which is united in living out a common mission.” Indeed, as Dominic pointed out, we are called to imitate our Lord Jesus Christ without remaining at that level of imitation by allowing him to penetrate our lives in order to “Wake up the World!”

As consecrated men and women, we are called upon to wake up ourselves first by having faith, holiness and hope. Looking at us, people expect holiness. However, we know too well that we are sinners. Hence, we need to keep on striving to be holy. Archbishop Gabriel called each one of us to find time to “bisect and digest the challenges of discerning our vocation as Christians with the help of good and educated formators in cognitive true love through sincere joy”.

Bishop Emmanuel Kofi Fianu pdfIn his presentation, Most Rev. Bishop Emmanuel Kofi Fianu recognised the fact that our diversity in the Church is very rich. “Hope is deeply rooted in our lives. (Thus), if only we live in despair, we will not be able to wake up the world. Three points are vital: encounter, communities of communion and religious creativity. God encounters us using our wounds, our brokenness, […] and our weaknesses. Still, God loves us. Consequently, loving our neighbour shows that we love God who loves us. If only we keep this spirit of loving one another as consecrated men and women, at the end of the day we will come to realize that something is really deeply rooted in our lives.” The Bishop could not understand why consecrated leaving together could start “a third world war” among them. “The mission is not theirs but belongs to Christ.”

He added to say that there are “many forms of apostolate though we are all involved in similar apostolate; education, caring for the sick and pastoral work. We are called to be in the front line of imagination and creativity in order to carry out the inspiration of our founders.” Furthermore, Bishop Fianu called each one of us “to name what we see: ignorance, if so, instead of poverty. All over the world, people are crying in silence. We have to listen attentively if we want to bring some consolation. Let us share their cry and anguish. Waking up the world is possible through our given charism.” Otherwise, if we fail, as one Sister pointed out, we may end up “defeating the purpose of our community or congregation.”

Ghana map_modifié-1We had a good time in Kumasi. I kept one question: How can we then make ourselves visible in our places of apostolate? Our interaction and sharing with other Religious Congregations gave us eagerness to continue our ministry. We are not alone carrying out the mission of Jesus Christ.

We ended our celebration with the Holy Mass at the Immaculate Conception Parish located in South Suntreso, Kumasi. Mass started with a candle light procession by all consecrated people presided by Most Rev. Gabriel Justice Yaw Anokye, Archbishop of Kumasi. The day ended with a common meal.

Click on the right to read the PDF file: Climaxing the Year of Consecrated Life

ICOF Program – Joy-Filled Gospel Service


ICOF logoInter-Congregational Ongoing Formation Program

Founding Congregations: · Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans) · Missionaries of Africa (White Fathers) · Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of Africa (MSOLA) · Society of African Missions (SMA)

GENERAL INFORMATION (see attached brochure) + Founding Congregation

​For Catholic priests and religious in Africa. Two months of professionally facilitated sharing of experience, skills and practical knowledge, leading to enrichment of the participants’ professional, human, pastoral, spiritual and academic lives.

Place: Marian University College (MARUCO), Bagamoyo, Tanzania. Dates: June 1st – July 31st, 2016

COURSE CONTENTS: The program covers the four areas of formation: personal renewal (human), spiritual deepening, pastoral empowering, and academic update.

The program will cover the following: · Bearing joyful witness to the gospel through my particular vocation · Challenges of faith in contemporary Africa · Dangers of various addictions · Emotional intelligence and resilience · Ethical issues in ministry (boundary issues, financial administration) · Evangelii Gaudium: the Joy of the Gospel · Exploring different ways of meditating · Gender issues · Graceful Transitions in Life · Interreligious dialogue · Introduction to pastoral counseling skills · ‘Laudato si’ · Justice, peace and Christian responsibility towards the Integrity of creation · Appreciative Discernment · Leadership and Management · Ministering in a globalised world · Retreat (8 days) on the Joy of the Gospel · Scripture and mission · Signature Strengths for mission · Trauma awareness, bereavement, stress management & inner child work.

Vision: Integrated priests and religious in Africa giving joyful gospel witness in their personal, spiritual and pastoral lives.

Mission: To provide Catholic priests and religious in Africa with opportunity, space and time for personal renewal with a view of better service of the Gospel in the concrete reality of Africa today.

Objectives: 1. Provide skills and opportunity for addressing personal challenges. 2. Provide space and time for reflecting on and integrating their lived experiences. 3. Training in pastoral skills. 4. Academic updating on Scripture, current trends in mission in the context of Africa and on the latest magisterial documents.  

Methodology: The methodology includes input sessions, one-on-one accompaniment and working with growth groups. There will be multicultural community living and team working.

Fees and scholarships: The full cost of the program is 2136 US Dollars. Candidates who will qualify for scholarships will pay only 900 US Dollars. This covers: Full board, tuition, accompaniment fees, library and Wi-Fi for internet connection.

Qualifications for applicants: · Being Catholic priest or religious · Being approximately 10 · 20 years in ministry · Those in transition from one ministry to another will find it beneficial · Being recommended by one’s superior / bishop · Having a reasonable mastery of English · Willing to be open to share oneself with others for mutual enrichment and growth. 

Application deadline: April 30, 2016

CONTACTING US: Inter-Congregational Ongoing Formation (ICOF) Program, C/o Marian University College, P.O. Box 47 Bagamoyo, Tanzania. – Tel.  Tanzania: +255 787 795 033 / 766 075 219 – Kenya: +254 727 729 146 / 731 673 305 – Uganda: +256 752 508 284 /+256 786 842 292 – Email: icofprogram@gmail.com. Founding Congregation1                Blog:  http://icofprogram.blogspot.com

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ICOF Logo Internet

Network Pastoral Africa – Third Meeting


Missio Meeting 2015 07b2By Romaric Bationo, M.Afr

From 6th to 9th November 2015, the 3rd annual meeting of the Network Pastoral Africa, organised and sponsored by Missio Aachen, took place at the AMECEA Pastoral Institute Gaba, in Eldoret, Kenya. The two previous meetings were held at Lumko, South Africa in 2013 and at the Centre for Social Concern and the Kungoni Centre of Culture and Art in Malawi in 2014.

At this 3rd meeting, six Pastoral Institutes from different corners of Africa were represented: the Capuchin Franciscan Research and Training Centre of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Lux Terra Leadership Foundation of Abuja, Nigeria; Tamale Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies, Ghana; Centro de Formacao de Nazare of Beira, Mozambique, Lumen Christi Institute of Arusha, Tanzania;  and Faith and Encounter Centre, Zambia. Other delegates came from: the AMECEA Pastoral Institute, Gaba; the Pastoral Department of the Catholic University of Eastern Africa, CUEA, the Pastoral Department of the Tanzania Episcopal Conference; the Commission for Pastoral and Lay Apostolate of Kenya; and from Missio Aachen. The big absents were the Centre for Social Concern, Kungoni Centre of Culture and Art, Malawi and Wadzanai Training Centre of Harare, Zimbabwe.

For the first time FENZA participated in this meeting and I was privileged to represent it.

This year, the discussions and presentations at the meeting revolved around the core theme of the pastoral challenges and implications of Evangelii Gaudium. The three main presentations were: Evangelii Gaudium and Interreligious Dialogue in Africa, by Rev Prof. Fredrick Mvumbi; Pastoral Challenges in Kenya in Relation to Evangelii Gaudium, by Prof. Eunice Kamaara; and Evangelii Gaudium in Relation to the Church as Family of God in Africa, by Rev Dr. Jordan Nyenyembe. Then the participating pastoral institutes, FENZA included, were given the opportunity to give each a presentation on the impetus the apostolic exhortation Evangelii Gaudium has had so far on their respective work.

Besides knowing, sharing and learning from one another, the most important point of this 3rd meeting of Network Pastoral Africa, was the setup of a concrete networking among the various Pastoral Institutes. Under the facilitation of Fr. Pikiti Febian Mulenga from the AMECEA Pastoral Department, the Pastoral Institutes reached and agreed on a networking action plan that should promote and advance co-operation among them.

At the end of the meeting, the delegates decided that the next Network Pastoral Africa meeting will take place from 3rd till the 6th February 2017 in Arusha, Tanzania.  

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Conference on Ecumenism – FENZA, 5th December 2015


Conference on Ecumenism 04bIn collaboration with St. Dominic Major Seminary, FENZA organised a conference on Ecumenism on Saturday the 5th December 2015. Above 20 participants of various Catholic parishes of Lusaka together with few Seminarians listened to the presentation made by Robert Lavertu, M.Afr, on Church history using a chart which he published recently. Father Charles Mwila also made a presentation by focusing on the theological, spiritual and pastoral aspects of Ecumenism.

Group discussion helped the participants to express their views on ecumenical issues looking into initiatives already taking place in various parishes such as Palm Sunday prayer and regular meetings with various Christian denominations concentrating on common ground.

Another speaker, Father Searson, presented his work at the Apostolate of Prayer focusing on the preparation of the yearly Octave of Prayer for Unity, which will take place as usual this coming year 2016 between the 18th and the 25th January. The participants were encouraged to get involved in this week of prayer.

It is the wish of the participants to renew this workshop with more people. Romaric Bationo, M.Afr, Director of FENZA, thanked the participants and emphasised that Ecumenism is part of FENZA’s vocation. An activity such as this one must continue and enjoy the participation of greater numbers of Catholics. Patrick Mumbi, M.Afr, concluded the day with a prayer.

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Invitation to the African Traditional Medicine (ATM) conference


FENZA Logo 2Topic: Where African and conventional medicine converge, if at all they do. A Discussion of the Importance of African medicine.

Date: 31/7/2015.  Time:  9:00 AM.   

Venue: FENZA. Faith and Encounter Centre Zambia, Off Leopards Hill Road, next to Radio Yatsani

Dear Sir/Madam,

Africa Traditional Medicine (ATM) has for centuries played a very important role in the treatment of various illnesses in Zambia and Africa at large. However it has faced a number of setbacks which has made it difficult for it to be officially and internationally recognised.

You have been identified as a key stake holder in the promotion of ATM and are therefore invited to attend a conference that will seek to explain the importance of ATM and how ATM can bring economic and health benefits to Zambia.

  1. Over view of the topic, by Fr Patrick Mumbi
  2. Where African and western medicine Converge, by Dr Muyangana Chrispin & Dr Getrude Mampwe
  3. Standards for African medicine: – ZABS, by Mr Saili Kelvin
  4. Patenting of African Medicine, by PACRA Representative
  5. Enhancing trade, training in traditional medicine. Participation in the global movement. Way forward. By Dr Chabinga