Political Violence in Livingstone parliamentary by-election, Zambia


For immediate release and circulation to the media

Dear all,
In the event of the unfortunate happenings in Livingstone, find here forwarded to you the attached statement. We hope to issue a stronger statement after getting some informed feedback from our staff who are currently on the ground and analysing issues behind the violent incidents which clearly do not auger well for our young and growing democracy.
With many prayers and kind regards in this holy season of Lent. Let us therefore continue to pray for our country. At the same time, let us all unite in praying for the Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, who will freely renounce and leave the Petrine Office today for the greater good of the Church he truly loves. How one wishes that the same humility, prudence, wisdom and strength of character could be imbued in our political leaders who are unfortunately thriving on fighting for and trying to keep the instruments of power at the expense of the common good.
Fr. Cleophas Lungu (Secretary General – ZEC)
 
Political Violence in Livingstone parliamentary by-election, Zambia

PRESS STATEMENT from Three Church Mother Bodies of Zambia

“Happy are the peacemakers: they shall be called children of God” (Mt 5:9)
We, the Council of Churches in Zambia (CCZ), the Evangelical Fellowship of Zambia (EFZ), and the Zambia Episcopal Conference (ZEC), are extremely disturbed and greatly saddened by the violence and loss of precious life in the heat of the recent campaigns for the Livingstone parliamentary by-election. Our hearts and prayers go out to the family of the deceased and all victims of violence. At the same time, we condemn in the strongest terms possible, any form political and electoral violence.
We further wish to appeal for calm and maximum restraint from the various political parties in Livingstone and also from the Zambia Police Service. It is incumbent on all of us not to do or say anything that might worsen an already volatile situation.
This is not the time for finger-pointing. What is needed now is for all stakeholders to do some serious soul-searching: Is this the level our politics has come to? Is this the path we want to pursue in our democratic dispensation?
Let us then commit this great nation to prayer. And may God bless us all!
Issued on 27th February, 2013 in Lusaka by the undersigned;
Rev. Suzanne Matale(General Secretary – CCZ)
Rev. Pukuta N. Mwanza (Executive Director – EFZ)
Fr. Cleophas Lungu (Secretary General – ZEC)

Words of thanks from Jean-Bosco Masaba


Words of thanks from Jean-Bosco Masaba
Dear Serge and all the confreres of Zambia.
Thanks for all what you have done for me, especially for helping me throughout my medical needs.
Thanks to the community of Mwapona Road for your warm welcome. “I was feeling good at home!”
Thanks again to all the confreres and stagiaires of Zambia. I am keeping good memories of all of you.
Thanks to the community of Kabwata, FENZA and Misisi.
Thanks also for my short stay in Kitwe. The confreres are very kind. Thanks for your availability.
Thanks to all of your who have prayed for me and sent messages through the blog and e-mails.
How can I thank you? I say: “Twatotela and twatasha”.
Ps: I came to Lubumbashi without problem. Only that I am feeling pain on my leg. I have stated some treatments. It will be OK!
Thanks Mingi, Jean-Bosco Masaba
Message de Jean-Bosco Masaba
Cher Serge et tous les confrères du secteur de la Zambie.
Merci beaucoup pour ce que vous avez fait pour moi, particulièrement pour les soins médicaux.
Merci à toute la communauté de la rue Mwapoma pour votre sens de l’accueil. “J’étais très très bien chez nous”.
Merci à tous les confrères et stagiaires du secteur Zambie. Je garde un bon souvenir de vous tous.
Merci à la communauté de Kabwata, de FENZA et de Misisi.
Merci encore pour le séjour que nous avons eu à Kitwe chez les confrères. Ils sont bien gentils et merci pour leur disponibilité.
Merci aux confrères qui m’ont  soutenu par leurs prières et messages envoyés sur le blogue et par courriel.
Comment vous dire merci? Je vous dis : “Twatotela et twatasha”.
Ps: Je suis bien arrivé à Lubumbashi: il y a juste la jambe qui continue à me faire mal. J’ai commencé avec la kiné. Ça ira!
Merci Mingi, Jean-Bosco Masaba

MALAWI: Rich 20% of population silent to plight of 80% poor


Lilongwe, Malawi (Agenzia Fides) – The Catholic Bishops of Malawi have expressed gratitude for the solution to a serious two week tug of war between the government and civil servants demanding a 67% pay rise. Protests caused serious social disruption. The authorities have agreed on a 61% per cent increase to the lowest salaries and 5% to the highest ones.
In a statement sent to Fides by the Bishops’ Commission for Justice and Peace, the Catholic Church in Malawi, tracing the roots of the trade union crisis, takes a position regarding the economic crisis which has afflicted the country for some time. The statement says the decision to devaluate Malawi Kwacha and continued floatation and the linkage of the fuel prices to the global market prices leading to automatic fuel price adjustments is worsening the economic situation of the people.
The Commission also criticises certain economic moves of the government such as the decision to privilege some investments over others.
These economic measures, say “Justice and Peace” have created a serious social fracture. “Malawi is seriously entrenching a two-tier society with over 80% of the population struggling to survive and depending on poor, over-stretched and quality-compromised public service delivery; while the 20% are affording privatized education, health and security services.” the statement affirms “This 20% of the population that is able is creating a section of passive and irresponsive citizenry that has become silent to the plight and cries of the majority poor”. (L.M.) (Agenzia Fides 25/2/2013)

Kitwe Parish, Zambia


Brief History, by Phelim Malumo, M.Afr
In 1993, the Missionaries of Africa with the team of Jean-Marie Beliveau and Maurits De Weerdt took over the two parishes of Kawama and Twatasha which was under the SMA. These Parishes were former outstations of Chimwemwe Parish. The team settled in Kawama, house No. 558. This house is owned by the diocese.
Kitwe is the largest city of the Copperbelt. The confreres are living in Kawama compound in the midst of families originating from all parts of Zambia and some from neighbouring countries (Congo, Tanzania, and Angola, etc). Kawama parish comprises Old Kawama, New Kawama and Kamatipa with a total population of about 40,000 of which 8,000 are Catholics. The White Fathers also serve Twatasha parish which covers Twatasha compound and Race Course with a population of about 25,000 people of which 6,000 are Catholics.
About 5% of the population work for different companies in Kitwe as skilled workers, but a good number are employed as watchmen or security guards and others work as house servants, charcoal burners, at the service of commercial farmers or tiling their own small plots along the Kafue River and Chingola road. However the majority of people struggle for survival in small businesses or trading in a variety of commodities.
 2013 Updates, by Serge St-Arneault, M.Afr
According to Jean-Bosco Masaba, who was on his journey back to Lubumbashi, Kawama means “the solitary man there!” A man was living on his own telling people that the place will be a good one in a near future; “pa kawama”. Also, Twatacha refers to a thankful man happy for the plot he had received; “thank you!”
There are fifteen small Christian communities in Kawama and nine in Twatacha. At the moment, four confreres are members of Kitwe community: Piet van Heijst from Holland, Jacques Bédard from Canada, Felix Kamunenge fom Zambia and Venance Shundu, stagiaire from Tanzania.

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CJTR Lusaka Press Release February 2013


JCTR LusakaJCTR Press Release 22 February 2013

Persistent late delivery of farming inputs harmful to food security, says the JCTR
Timely delivery of farming inputs such as seeds is crucial to ensuring a good harvest. The delivery of adequate and timely inputs by the government is important to many small-scale farmers who continue to heavily rely on the Farmer Input Support Programme (FISP). This is why the delivery of farming inputs continues to attract attention from both the government and non-governmental stakeholders. READ MORE

BREAD BASKET JANUARY 2013