Death of the mother of our confrere Paul Kitha, M.Afr


Mother of Paul Kitha
Maman n’est plus, sans nous dire au revoir! Paix à son âme ! Mama, Teleza Kayuni you don’t even say goodbye. May your soul Rest in Eternal Peace!

The Provincial Delegate of SAP in Malawi sent us a message through WhatsApp announcing the death of the mother or our confrere Paul Kitha who is currently in Burkina Faso as a missionary. Thereza Kayuni passed away yesterday in Mzuzu. She died peacefully as she was having her midday meal. She dropped her plate and felt on the side. The program of her funerals and burial is not yet final. Let us pray for Paul’s mother and also for Paul and the entire family.

SAP Provincial Council, March 2017, at FENZA, Lusaka, Zambia


SAP Provincial Council March 2017 05SAP Provincial Council gathered on the third week of March at FENZA, Lusaka, for its first meeting of the year. As usual, the four Sectors of the Province were represented by their Provincial Delegates and their Councillors. From Rome, Francis Barnes was also present with his usual sense of humour. A word of thanks was given by the Provincial, Felix Phiri, to Serge St-Arneault who will be ending his mandate as Provincial Secretary in few months from now. He has been appointed as Director of the Afrika Center in Montreal, Canada. Michel Meunier will replace him from July 2017.

SAP Provincial Council March 2017 02bSAP Provincial Council March 2017 03b

Centre Afrika logo

Death of FATHER LÉOPOLD LALONDE, M. Afr.


Léopold Lalonde_JPEG “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will still live, even if he dies. ” John 11, 25

 Friday, March 10, 2017

Father Gilles Barrette, Provincial of the Americas, informs you of the death of FATHER LÉOPOLD LALONDE, M. Afr. He died on March 10 2017, in Sherbrooke, at the age of 89 years of which 62 of missionary life in Zambia and Canada. Let us pray for the repose of his soul.

Missionnaires d’Afrique, 1640, rue St-Hubert, Montréal, H2L 3Z3  mafrsecr@mafr.net


  PLACE COUNTRY

1956-10-01

Arrival Mambwe

Zambia

1961-01-17

Teaching Abercorn  

1961-05-17

Curate

Mambwe

 

1962-12-05

Foundation Kantensha  
1963-07-01 Supérieur

Isoka

 

1969-01-18

Retreat Villa Cavalletti  

1978-03-03

Session-Retreat

Jerusalem

 
1978-10-01 Supérieur

Mambwe

 

1980-03-01

Regional Councillor    
1984-01-01 Curate

Isoka

 
1986-01-01 Parish Priest Isoka – Mbala

Zambia

1988-04-13

Home leave/Prov.>18.09.88    
1992-05-01 Home leave /Prov.>00.09.92    

1994-09-01

Sabbatical Italy/Canada   Canada
1994-10-31 Focolarini, Loppiano Incisa, Val d’Arno

Italia

1995-05-17

Home leave /Prov.>10.12.95    
1995-10-01 Ministry to the sick Kasama, St Joseph’s

Zambia

1998-05-13

Home leave /Prov.>14.08.98    
2001-07-21 Home leave /Prov.>08.11.01    

2004-05-27

Home leave /Prov.>06.09.04    
2010-11-01 Back to Canada  

Canada

2017-03-10

Death Sherbrooke

Canada

Léopold Lalonde medalSee the link: The President’s Insignia of Mercy attributed to Léopold Lalonde

Also: PDF file: The President’s Insignia of Mercy attributed to Léopold Lalonde

 

First edition of Mansa Diocese Roundup for the year 2017, Zambia.


Mansa Roundup Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 1 No. 21 logoBy Rt. Rev. Patrick Chisanga, OFM Conv., Bishop of Mansa Diocese

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ, as the Year 2017 Unfolds, I present to you this first edition of Mansa Roundup for the year 2017: In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.

The Pastoral Theme that is accompanying our programs this year is: Ba Minshioni ba Lelo Nifwe (We are the Missionaries of Today). This is inspired by the ongoing commemoration, of 125 years, since the arrival of the first Catholic Missionaries into the present day Zambia, and 116 into today’s Mansa Diocese.

On the national level, this Jubilee was inaugurated, on 6th August 2006, at Mambwe Mwela in Mbala District, the very site of first settlement by the pioneer White Fathers (1891). The celebrations will conclude, on 15th July 2017, with the solemn celebration of the Eucharist in Lusaka.

Locally, in Mansa Diocese, the celebrations were launched on 2nd October 2016 at Santa Maria wa Mwelu, near Chibote Mission, where the first missionaries settled in 1900 and intended to establish the first Catholic mission in the Luapula region. The ruins and bricks of the house for priests are still intact up to date – a living sign of the continued sacredness of this site. To this very place we are returning on 7th October for the diocesan solemn closure of this year of celebrating the arrival and works of the pioneer missionaries. This would also be the fitting occasion to consecrate this holy site as a Diocesan Marian Shrine, dedicated to the Queen of Missionaries. Let us all work together towards the success of these events, for Ba Minshioni ba Lelo Nifwe.

Patrick Chisanga, OFM ConvThe beginning of this year has been crowned with significant events in the life of our Diocese and the realization of its Vision. It was very remarkable, for instance, that the very first procession into the Cathedral, for the New Year Eucharistic celebration, was led by a person with special needs who carried the processional cross and served during Mass. Our dear friend, Billy Beddor, who was born with Down Syndrome 51 years ago, came all the way from the US with his sister Sandy and sister-in-law, Coleen, together with Amy Hewitt and her team from the University of Minnesota.

The training they conducted regarding people with disabilities was a great step towards the realization of our Vision of “A Diocese that Embraces Everyone with Christ’s Love.” To this effect, I call upon every parish and diocesan institution to put in place deliberate policies that fosters love, respect and inclusion of people with disabilities.

Another significant blessing at the beginning of this year (5th January) was the Government’s handover of Kabunda Girls Secondary School as a Catholic Mission School with Grand-Aided status. This followed the arrival of the Dominican Sisters in the Diocese (4th January) who have since been entrusted with management of the institution, which on 24th February was re-dedicated as Holy Trinity Girls Secondary School during the solemn Eucharistic celebration. Welcome to Mansa dear Sisters and thank you for taking up the challenge. The needs of this school are immense; let us all contribute to its rebuilding.

A hearty welcome also to members of other religious institutes who have recently come on board to contribute to our mission of giving life in abundance to God’s flock (John 10:10). I thank in particular the superiors of the Little Servants of Mary Immaculate (LSMI), the Franciscan Missionaries of Divine Motherhood (FMDM), the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians (Salesian Sisters), the Sisters of St Joseph (Soeurs de Sant Joseph Auxiliatrice de L’Eglise) and our own Sisters of Mercy for the personnel they have made available to serve in the various apostolates of the Diocese in the recent past. Furthermore, I welcome the many lay faithful who have come to our Diocese and are already fully involved in the life of their respective new parishes.

Events such as the foregoing are a source of great hope for our Diocese despite the many challenges we face, especially those arising from the economic crisis that have always haunted our region of Luapula. Let us be united and fight this dehumanising evil of poverty. Let us also demand positive action from all our leaders, especially those appointed to high portfolios of central Government who tend to forget their roots. There shall be no excuse for them not to make a difference.

As the year 2017 unfolds, I invite everyone to pay heed to the Lord’s command, which we have also adopted as the theme for our Diocesan Strategic Plan 2016-2021, to “Let Down the Nets for a Catch” (Luke 5:4). All departments and individuals must strive to implement the strategic goals that pertain to them. Let us be true missionaries of today who pledge not to betray the great sacrifice and works of the pioneer missionaries.

May God bless all our readers of Mansa Roundup. Thank you for your constructive feedback and every support. Have a fruitful Lenten Season.

Click here to open the PDF file of this magazine.

 

Mafrwestafrica lettre du 07 mars 2017


Mafrwestafrica logoAujourd’hui, les Missionnaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest vous proposent de visiter de nouvelles pages sur leur site http://www.mafrwestafrica.net.

Actualités

« Rencontres littéraires de Niamey 2017 » qui auront lieu au Niger du 20-26 mars 2017. Événement littéraire majeur de la sous-région, ces rencontres ont pour ambition de provoquer la rencontre du grand public avec des auteurs nigériens et des pays voisins (lire la suite)

« Décès du père Joseph-Roger de Benoist » le 15 février à Bry-sur-Marne. Il travailla entre autres au Sénégal, Mali, Bénin, Burkina Faso. (lire la suite)

« FESPACO 2017 » des textes et images parues sur le site de Radio-France-Internationale le 4 mars 2017 (lire la suite)

« Palmarès du Fespaco », informations prises elles aussi sur le site de RFI le 5 mars 2017 (lire la suite)

Témoignages 

« Communauté de Toulouse en France ». L’installation du nouveau curé a été l’occasion de vivre une célébration multiculturelle très appréciée. (lire la suite)

« Message du Pape pour le carême » Le pape y médite sur la parabole du riche et de Lazare, mettant en garde contre l’attachement à l’argent et encourageant à « une conversion sincère » (lire la suite)

« Un jésuite israélien témoigne » dans un ouvrage hétéroclite et foisonnant, le jésuite israélien autour des thèmes qui lui sont chers, notamment la théologie de la Terre sainte et le dialogue interreligieux au Proche-Orient. (lire la suite)

Dialogue interreligieux

« Décès du père Claude Geffré » Si ce prêtre dominicain décédé à l’âge de 90 ans était expert en herméneutique biblique, le pluralisme religieux était également l’un de ses domaines de recherche et de réflexion (lire la suite)

« Que disent les musulmans de Jésus », la recension d’un livre ou Douze Musulmans parlent de Jésus, sous la direction de Fawzia Zouari (lire la suite)

« Karima Berger écrivaine franco-algérienne » et préside l’association « Écritures et spiritualités » a organisé le 4 mars, à Paris, un salon du livre ouvert aux auteurs s’inspirant des grandes traditions spirituelles (lire la suite)

Justice et Paix

« Alep se relève malgré la guerre » le témoignage de Andrea Avveduto le 31 janvier 2017, suite à sa rencontre avec le frère Ibrahim Alsabagh, curé dans une paroisse d’Alep depuis octobre 2014 (lire la suite)

« Meilleures relations entre Burkina et Côte d’Ivoire » La venue du président Ivoirien à la clôture du Fespaco n’est pas anodine et  semble bien signifier une amélioration des relations entre les deux pays (lire la suite)

« Se mobiliser contre l’insécurité », c’est ce que font des peuls du Mali, du Burkina et du Niger (lire la suite)

Vu au Sud – Vu du Sud

« Au Burkina, émotion et colère des enseignants » après la tuerie dans le Soum, le double assassinat du directeur d’école et d’un habitant à Karfayel (lire la suite)

« L’ONU contre Boko Haram » les diplomates ONUSIENS se sont rendus à Ndjamena puis à Niamey pour faire le point de la situation (lire la suite)

« L’opposition manifeste au Niger » pour réclamer plus de transparence dans la gestion des ressources du pays (lire la suite)

« Lutte contre le terrorisme au Mali » les premières patrouilles mixtes entre soldats maliens, groupes armés pro-gouvernementaux et ex-rebelles relancent timidement les espoirs de paix dans le nord du Mali (lire la suite)

Nice story of Sister Vickness in Paris, France


vickness-namgogo-b-2015BY Sister Vickness Nangogo Muleya, MSOLA.

On the 26th February, five days after my arrival in Paris, Sister Agnes, who once was my Novice mistress, and I went to visit our Sisters in Sceaux where we were invited for lunch.

When I had heard about the invitation, I was not sure whether I really wanted to go because I did not know how to speak French. I told myself not to trouble the elderly Sisters when I cannot speak French and they cannot speak English! I wondered to myself what it would be like and as I thought of it, I said to myself, “I won’t go but would propose to Agnes to go there when I could speak French!” Indeed, I tried to propose to her as, so far, since my arrival she has been so kind to show me around the place also because she can speak English easily. However, when I proposed to her to inform the Sisters that I would go there sometime later in March and not then, she did not agree with me. She believed that it would be no problem and that the Sisters did not mind at all even though I did not believe her. Mmmmnh! My plan to escape could not work.

However, on that particular Sunday, after Mass, we prepared to go. We took a train and in no time, we were there! Inside me I was trying hard to recollect all little words of French I had heard or learnt before but to no avail!

We arrived in time before lunch so that I could greet the Sisters and be introduced to them and vice versa. Upon arrival, we found Sister Marie Cécile waiting to welcome us with a big smile on her face! I told myself ‘now what to say Vicky’ and before I knew it, I was also beaming with a smile, we hugged and said our “bonjours” and that was all, I was mute, my French was finished! Turning around, the Sisters were all there coming one after the other to greet and welcome us.

Nonetheless, surprisingly enough, the Sisters seemed not to mind at all that I could not speak French. What seemed to be more important for them was that a younger Sister, their own Sister, fresh from Africa was there to visit them. They were eager to hear from me the news about where I was coming from, what I was doing and so forth.

Inside myself, there was no question of language anymore but I was only filled with love for these Sisters of mine who were so happy and graceful! They are all old but very serene and happy, grateful for whatever they have been, lived and are in their life.

At lunch, I sat with Sister Françoise de Traversay. We were in the same community during my postulate; Sister Agnes, who had accompanied me, Sister Claire-Michelle, who has worked in Uganda, and Sister Nicole Robion. I leave you to imagine the conversation!

To my happy surprise, after lunch, I saw each Sister getting busy with a little service. Some were cleaning the tables, others were cleaning the dining floor and others offered to place the washed dishes in their respective places! Noticing my admiration, one Sister explained that, in fact, they do most of the simple and sometimes big responsibilities themselves such as bursar, accounts, secretariat and administration! After it, they went for a short nap each to their room while Sisters Marie-Cécile, Francoise and Agnes took me for a walk through the park of Sceaux. A very big and beautiful park.

parc-de-sceauxIn addition to the beauty of the day, at 2:30 pm, all the Sisters gathered in the sitting room where I was to share with them the video about the Thanksgiving Mass and departure of MSOLA from Zambia. This moment was so solemn and created a reflective, appreciative atmosphere among the sisters. They were very happy and grateful that I had shared the video with them. They even proposed to show it to all the other communities I would visit later, in the days to come. At the end of the day we had a cup of coffee together and interacted more, it was wonderful!

Perceptions and conceptions are not always what the reality is. Today I am happy to have a joyful, happy appreciation of our common mission. I was happy to see life among these elderly Sisters, looking at them being so happy and at peace with each other. I felt encouraged and I experienced God very close to his loved ones. With God, life is eternal!

sceaux

Traduction en français de sœur Vickness qui ne fait que commencer à s’exprimer en français. Félicitation!

Une belle histoire de Sœur Vickness à Paris, France.

Le 26 février, six jours après mon arrivée à Paris, Sœur Agnès, qui a été ma maîtresse de Novice, et moi-même, sommes allé rendre visite à nos sœurs à Sceaux où nous avions été invités pour le déjeuner.

Je n’étais pas sûr si je voulais vraiment y aller, car je ne parle pas la langue de Molière.Pourquoi déranger les sœurs âgées si je ne peux pas communiquer avec elles ? J’ai plutôt pensé à m’y rendre seulement lorsque je parlerais le français! C’est ce que j’ai proposé à Sœur Agnès qui était d’ailleurs si gentille avec moi et peu parler anglais. Mais elle n’a pas été d’accord. Elle savait que les sœurs ne se souciaient pas du tout de ce problème linguistique. Mmmmnh ! Mon plan de fuite n’a pas fonctionné !

Toutefois, après la messe du dimanche, nous nous sommes préparés à partir. Nous avons pris un train et nous y étions en peu de temps! Je m’efforçais de me rappeler toutes les petites paroles de français que j’avais entendues ou apprises, mais sans succès!

Nous sommes arrivés avant le déjeuner pour que je puisse être présenté à la communauté. Nous avons trouvé Sœur Marie Cécile qui nous attendait avec un grand sourire ! Je me disais « maintenant quoi dire Vicky ? » et avant que je le sache, je rayonnais aussi avec un sourire. Nous avons simplement dit “bonjours”. C’était tout. J’étais muette ! Me retournant, les sœurs sont apparues pour me saluer et nous accueillir.

Les sœurs ne semblaient pas du tout gênées que je ne puisse parler français. Ce qui leur était important, c’était de voir une sœur cadette venue d’Afrique pour les visiter. Elles étaient impatientes d’avoir des nouvelles de mon pays, ce que je faisais et ainsi de suite.

À l’intérieur de moi-même, il ne s’agissait plus de langage. Je n’étais que remplie d’amour pour mes sœurs qui étaient si heureuses et si gracieuses! Elles sont toutes âgées, mais très sereines, heureuses et reconnaissantes pour ce qu’elles ont été et vécu dans leur plus jeune vie en Afrique.

Au déjeuner, je me suis assis avec Sœur Françoise de Traversay qui a été dans ma communauté pendant mon postulat. Agnès, qui m’avait accompagnée, Sœur Claire-Michelle, qui a travaillé en Ouganda, et Sœur Nicole Robion. Je vous laisse imaginer la conversation ! Après le déjeuner, à mon heureuse surprise, j’ai vu chaque sœur s’occuper d’un petit service. Certaines nettoyaient les tables, d’autres le plancher de la salle à manger, d’autres plaçaient les assiettes et plats lavés dans les armoires! Remarquant mon admiration, une sœur a expliqué qu’elles assument la plupart des responsabilités; économat, secrétariat et l’administration. Puis, elles allèrent faire une petite sieste dans leur chambre tandis que les Sœurs Marie-Cécile, Françoise et Agnès m’ont amené faire une promenade dans le parc de Sceaux. Un très grand et beau parc.

En après-midi, toutes les sœurs se sont rassemblées dans la salle de télévision pour visionner une vidéo sur la messe d’Actions de grâces et la fermeture de notre dernière maison de Lusaka en Zambie. Ce moment a été solennel et a créé une atmosphère réfléchie et appréciative parmi les sœurs. Elles étaient très heureuses et reconnaissantes que j’aie partagé cette vidéo avec elles. Elles m’ont même proposé de le montrer à toutes les autres communautés que je visiterais plus tard. À la fin de la journée, autour d’une tasse de café, nous avons pu poursuivre nos échanges. C’était merveilleux !

Perceptions et préconceptions ne reflètent pas la réalité. Aujourd’hui, je suis contente de pourvoir apprécié notre commune mission. J’ai été heureuse de voir ces sœurs âgées pleines de vie. Elles sont sereines et vivent en paix les unes avec les autres. J’ai senti la présence de Dieu dans celles qu’Il aime. Avec Dieu, la vie est éternelle !

Return to the Lord of Brother Willem (Wim) van Dijk, M.Afr


willem-van-dijkBrother Willem (Wim) van Dijk return to the Lord of on Saturday the 18th of February 2017 at Heythuysen (Netherlands)at the age of 90, of which 30 years of missionary life in Zambia and 36 years in the Netherlands. Let us pray for him and for his loved ones.

Milestones of Brother Wim van Dijk’s life: Brother Wim van Dijk was born on the 20th of November 1926 at Tilburg in the Diocese of ‘s-Hertogenbosch. He began his Spiritual Year at ‘s-Heerenberg on the 7th of September 1946, where he took his Temporary Oath on the 17th of September 1948 and his Final Oath on the 7th of August 1954.

25/03/1960

from Lubushi to Lusaka Zambia

09/09/1963

 

Ilondola, Diocese of Mbala

Zambia

01/01/1968

Parish

Ilondola, Diocese of Mbala

Zambia

01/01/1977

Maintenance

Lubushi Seminary

Zambia

01/01/1987

Maintenance

Mansa, Diocese of Mansa

Zambia

01/01/1988 Services Lubwe, Diocese of Mansa

Zambia

09/03/1990 Services Kasaba, Diocese of Mansa

Zambia

South Africa Sector Post Cap Deliberations – Formation House in Merrivale, KwaZulu/Natal


Spirituality-Charism-Community-Mission-Service

post-cap-feb-2017-01cThe South Africa Sector held its Post Capitular Assembly from Tuesday 14th February till Thursday 16th February. We thank especially Fr. Bill Turnbull, M.Afr., from the Malawi Sector for preparing our documents and for guiding us all through our Post Cap. Bill put a lot of effort into this event.  He focused primarily on our fundamentals and foundation as Missionaries of Africa: our Spirituality-Charism and Community living, then looked at our Mission, with all its complexities of pastoral insertion; placing ourselves at the service of Africa at the existential peripheries; encountering and dialoguing with others, especially other faiths and Islam; addressing issues of poverty, corruption, land, racism and migrants, justice & peace and ecology.  Even though we had three full days, it wasn’t enough to really address and process the issues affecting us in our mission here in South Africa. Despite our very diverse cultures, languages and ages etc., we could sense a real unity of purpose and direction in the spirit of the Chapter. We look forward to the final Provincial Strategic Plan to come from the upcoming Provincial Council to be held in a couple of weeks’ time. 

Father, Son & Holy Spirit Guide Us

At the opening on Tuesday morning, following the Chapter’s example, we held a small ceremony of the lighting of candles which remained lit for the duration of our Post Cap. The candles represented the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, the Triune God, and we prayed this God guide us, and keep us united, through our sharing’s, discussions and deliberations. Bill composed three prayers which were read out as each of the three candles were lit. Each morning, as we opened our discussions, these candles were lit.

Ecological – ‘Paperless-Digital’ Gathering

One significant change of this Post Cap and the general Sector Meeting, which was held on the Monday before (13th Feb), was that we had a ‘paperless’, or ‘digital’ Post Cap. Basically, the only paper we used was the actual Chapter document itself. This was a first for our Sector and we will continue to be ecologically sensitive to how we run our meetings and gatherings. Everything was done on computer, using flash drives and projecting our documents onto a large screen. Feedback was done by a group spokesperson or secretary who typed up everything onto the group flash drive. This was then given to the moderator and to the Post Cap secretaries. We are happy that during this Post Cap we could begin to implement the call to be more ecologically sensitive.

Nkosi sikeleli Afrika

We pray for our Province of SAP, and we pray for each of the four Sectors. May we each be true witnessing Apostles and good stewards in our mission and service of Africa where we are – and may our Mother Mary, Queen of Africa, guide and direct all our actions to and through her beloved Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. May His Kingdom come.

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Bishop’s Lenten Message 2O17 from +Patrick Chisanga, OFM Conv


ash-wednesday-pngSpiritual Warfare against Evil Intensified: Ba Minshioni Ba Lelo Nifwe.

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

  1. On 1st March we begin the Season of Lent – the intensive 40 days’ spiritual journey towards that great summit of our Christian faith and worship: the annual celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus from the Dead, the ultimate victory of good over evil.
  2. The Word of God that is proclaimed during the liturgical celebrations of the subsequent five Sundays (Year A) have a particularly rich pedagogical character that guides catechumens towards the waters of baptism and general Christian Initiation on the Easter Vigil. All the faithful must equally endeavour to draw maximum benefit from the wealth of these carefully selected passages, in view of their own solemn renewal of the baptism promises during the same Easter Vigil and in order to be spiritually recharged for the ongoing battle against temptations and sin.

The Sunday Gospel passages that will lead the way during this Lenten itinerary include: (1) The Temptations of Jesus – Matthew 4;7-17, (2) The Transfiguration of Jesus – Matthew 17:1-9, (3) Jesus’ Encounter with the Samaritan Woman at the Well – John 4:5-42, (4) Jesus’ Healing of the Man who was Born Blind – John 9:1-42 and (5) Jesus’ Raising of Lazarus from Death – John 11:1-45.

As you may notice, the last three passages from the Gospel according to John are quite lengthy. However, with adequate preparation, these Readings may be proclaimed using the role-play format, as is done on Palm Sunday and Good Friday. The priest and selected faithful could take the respective roles of Jesus and other individuals in the passage. By so doing and, when done diligently, this manner of proclamation enables the congregation to follow with greater attention.

I invite all priests to carefully meditate upon these Readings during this whole period of grace so as to be able to deliver a fitting message to the faithful during the celebration of the Eucharist. Furthermore, in view of the so many Centres that still do not have priests on Sundays, I ask all parish priests to ensure that there is sufficient prior preparation of the prayer leaders and/or catechists who are selected to comment on the Word of God during the Sunday worship in their respective outstations.

In addition, I enclose, with this letter, the Lenten homily notes that the JCTR has graciously shared with us. Let them be further distributed to the Small Christian Communities (SCC), Lay Groups as well as individuals for further reflection and appropriate action that is inspired by the Word of God.

  1. This year’s Lent coincides with the Pastoral Theme in our Diocese according to which we celebrate the ministry of the pioneer missionaries and declare that “We are the Missionaries of Today” (Ba Minshioni ba Lelo, Nifwe). Let us recall the sacrifice, availability and pastoral zeal of our gallant pioneer missionaries and in turn make a commitment to the effect that their works will live on through each one of us. Indeed, the Church, in Mansa Diocese, shall continue to announce the Good News to all creation, in obedience to the great commission of our Lord Jesus (Mark L6: 15).
  2. To rekindle this missionary zeal, the Lenten Season offers us the instruments of Prayer, Fasting and Almsgiving according to the guidance of Jesus, as proclaimed in the Gospel passage of Ash Wednesday (Matthew 6:1-6,16-18). These three pillars of Lent, when taken seriously, have the capacity to bring about lasting positive change in our lives, especially in overcoming the sinful habits that we repeatedly struggle with. I invite each one of you to pray, fast and give alms with the intention of being liberated from any such demeaning slavery.

Furthermore, in order to intensify our spiritual warfare against evil through combined effort and, in response to the appeals made during the Pastoral Council Meeting last October, I again invite the faithful in all our parishes to observe the “24 hours for the Lord” on the Friday to Saturday of the 3rd Week of Lent (24 – 25 March). Let this day be flooded with prayers, songs, Eucharistic adoration, catechesis and actual celebration of the Sacraments of Reconciliation and the Eucharist. lt would be fitting that this special day concludes with the joyful Eucharistic celebration of the solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord on Saturday, 25th March.

I implore you, my dear brothers and sisters in the Diocese, to take the invitation seriously and spare this ’24 hours’ exclusively for the Lord. Bring to this special period of intense prayer the needs of our society and individual members for healing from anger, guilt, unforgiving heart, drunkenness, sexual immoralities, pride, selfishness, etc. Through this prayer, let us also invoke Divine intervention to end the ongoing violence against the sanctity of human life, the values of marriage and family as well as the integrity of God’s creation.

  1. May the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God the Father and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you. I wish you a fruitful and grace-filled Lenten Season 2017.

Given on this First Day of March in the Year of the Lord 2017, the Ash Wednesday

The role of women in evangelisation and sustainable development in Kasamba, Zambia.


Benjamin-Itungabose-2014
Benjamin Itungabose

By Benjamin Itungabose, M.Afr

We had a gathering of all the leaders of the Catholic Women’s Organisation in Kasamba Parish two weeks ago. Were present the leaders of this lay group from each outstation. Those who came to animate the gathering were from the Diocese. The women shared about their role in the family and the Church. The main point on the Agenda was the “Seminarian Fund.” The leaders from the Diocese explained to them the aim of this Fund and the prime role that women have to feed it. Women have always been at the forefront in the education of children. Hence forming the future ministers of the Church is a responsibility of every Catholic woman. The leaders of the different outstations of our Parish were encouraged to go back to their respective Centres to sensitise all Catholic women to make their contribution. Each Catholic woman is required to pay 10 kwacha ($1). Those who participated in the gathering paid their contribution on the spot.

Besides the Seminarian Fund, the women were also given lessons on entrepreneurship. The diocesan treasurer together with the diocesan chairperson of the Catholic Women’s Organisation in Mansa Diocese taught them how to start and manage a business. Those who attended the lessons were absolutely delighted. The aim of the lessons was to encourage women to work hard in order to care for their families and the Church. At first they were worried about how to find a capital to start a business. But they were reminded that God has already given us the most valuable capital which is the land. This was a revelation which struck all the attendants. They went back home enlightened and ready to start working hard for a sustainable development of their families and the Church.

South Africa Budget 2017: An economic or spiritual matter?


budget-safr-russell-pollittBy Russell Pollitt SJ

Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan made a strong call to conversion in his 2017 Budget Speech. Quoting Pope Francis he said, “Reforming the social structures which perpetuate poverty and the exclusion of the poor first requires a conversion of mind and heart”. He went on to say, “We need to radically transform our economy so that we have a more diversified economy, with more jobs and inclusivity in ownership and participation”.

There is no doubt that South Africa is sitting on a fast-ticking social time bomb. Crunching numbers and good fiscal control alone will no longer keep the wolves at bay.

Gordhan’s Budget Speech alluded many times to key themes in Catholic Social Teaching (CST): option for the poor, trust, solidarity, human dignity, the call to community, responsibility and accountability. The 2017 Budget pointed to a bigger problem which is not simply economic: at the heart of South Africa’s woes is a spiritual crisis. We must build a true community of kinship. This is our strongest antidote to the crisis.

It is tempting to look at the figures presented in the Budget and notice the ways in which I am affected. Petrol will rise by 39c, alcohol and cigarettes by between 6%-10%, those who earn more will pay more tax on a sliding scale. But it would be short-sighted (and maybe even selfish) to stop there. The bigger picture is essential and, it seems, that’s exactly what Gordhan chose to paint this year.

South Africa can no longer afford to allow a few to live extravagant lives while millions live below the poverty line with little or no hope for their future or that of their children. The country can no longer allow leaders to feather their own nests. It can no longer allow corporates and multinationals to avoid tax liabilities.

Difficult global economic and political conditions notwithstanding, it is personal and social transformation which will empower us to live with social and moral integrity. Transformation is a term which is often used in political rhetoric. It is, however, theologically rich and, in that sense, might save us from a pending social and economic crisis. Transformation is not political. It points to a systemic re-ordering and re-prioritising where it counts most: morally.

Towards the end of the Budget Speech Gordhan paraphrased what he said last year. He urged us to make right choices and do the right things so that we build a just and fair society, founded on the principles of human dignity and equality. He asked activists, workers, the business community, clergy, professionals and citizens to actively engage in shaping the transformation agenda so that we do realise a just and equitable society –a society founded on kinship.

The bottom line is that if we want prosperity and peace we must submit ourselves and our lives to transformation, to living a key Gospel truth: we are our brother and sister’s keepers.

We have a collective and social moral responsibility to build the society we want to live in. When we take that responsibility seriously then a community of kinship begins to emerge.

We would do well too if we recall that uncomfortable yet piercing Gospel truth: “To whom much is given, much will be required.” (Luke 12:48)

Follow Russell Pollitt on twitter @rpollittsj

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SAP Young Confreres meeting in FENZA, Zambia.


young-confreres-feb-2017-02-jpegSAP Young Confreres are meeting in FENZA, Zambia, to share their experiences as missionaries. They all have a few years of ministry and full of zeal. The participants are: Remacle Lamec Ciza from Henley-KwaMphumuza, South Africa, Frank Mbala Kalala from Sussundenga, Mozambique, Benjamin Itungabose from Kasamba, Zambia, Mathew Banseh from Lumimba, Zambia, Douglas Moumanyi Ogato from Serenje, Zambia, Lawrence Tukamushaba from Kasama, Zambia, Africano Mucunguzi from Mua, Malawi, Emmanuel Barongo from Kanengo, Malawi, Alain Christian Muhineza from Namushakende, Zambia and Jean-Bosco Nibigira from Dombe, Mozambique.

Animators: Deogratias Ngowi from Merrivale, South Africa and Justin Sebakunzi from Lua-Luo Spiritual Formation Centre, Zambia. Also on the picture: Felix Phiri, SAP Provincial.

We celebrate our 150th Anniversary!


A short history.

The Society of the Missionaries of Africa (M.Afr) was founded in Algeria, in 1868 by Cardinal Charles Lavigerie, Archbishop of Algiers; he would later be-come Cardinal Lavigerie (July 1882). From the beginning, this new missionary society took the Arab dress: the “gandoura”, with, as a religious sign, a rosary worn like a necklace. This earned them the name “White Fathers”. One year later, in 1869, Cardinal Lavigerie also founded the Congregation of the Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of Africa (MSOLA). Today, there are 1,232 Missionaries of Africa, from 37 Nationalities, working in 42 Countries, 22 of which are in Africa. They live in 217 communities; with a further 486 candidates at various stages of formation.

150-anniversary-m-afr-logo-saSouth Africa.

At the request of the Malawi Catholic Bishops’ Conference, in 1969 the Missionaries of Africa finally came down to South Africa in order to minister to the 70,000 Malawian migrants working in the lucrative mines around Johannesburg, Rustenburg and Witbank. The Malawian Catholic Mine Chaplaincy soon became the Catholic Mine Chaplaincy as the first missionary communities answered the call of all migrant mine workers, drawn from the neighbouring countries, to have a Catholic presence in their mine. Twenty years later the mine chaplaincy was integrated into each Diocese, through parish structures.

Our commitments over the years.

As the Missionaries of Africa became more known; new requests for communities were sent to the General House in Rome. The response was positive, and in rather quick succession, missionary communities were founded in Bethlehem Diocese: Phuthaditjhaba/Qwaqwa and eventually Bohlokong; in Pretoria Archdiocese in the KwaNdebele region: Tweefontein, Siyabuswa and Diepsloot; in Witbank Diocese: Kamhlushwa, Malelane and eventually KwaGuqa; in Johannesburg Archdiocese: Soweto (Zola, Zondi, Emdeni and Protea North), Orange Farm, and later, Lenasia.

From 1998 to 2004, three of our Missionaries ran the Lumko Institute in Benoni. The most recent insertion is a formation house in Durban Archdiocese: Merri-vale has more than 30 theology students from various African countries who study theology at Cedara St. Joseph Institute. Furthermore, we have two parishes near Pietermaritsburg: Henley and KwaMpumuza. Our students enjoy going there for their weekend apostolate.

A community in Edenglen, Johannesburg, acts as a hub for administration and vocation animation, while welcoming many visitors. At the same time, the priests of this community offer much appreciated services to local parishes, groups, schools and religious communities of that area and beyond.

And the mission goes on…

In their almost 50 years in South Africa (2019), the Missionaries of Africa living in communities, have tried to respond to requests for primary evangelisation, and moving on when the local Church has been established. Due to dwindling numbers and the maturity of the local Church in South Africa, today communities are found in the formation house in Merrivale, Henley,  KwaMpumuza, Bethlehem, Lenasia and Edenglen; 17 confreres in all.

The contribution has been modest but sincere; a missionary effort to building a vibrant local Church. The presence of a Formation House bodes well for the future and will ensure a Missionaries of Africa presence in South Africa for the foreseeable future.

We sincerely hope and pray that this Jubilee celebration will finally arouse in some young men the desire of a true vocation as Missionaries of Africa. What a wonderful gift from the South African Church this would be to us! Please, pray for us!

With God’s blessings.

Missionaries of Africa, P.O. Box 10057, Edenglen 1613, South Africa. Tel: 011 452 5283.

SACBC Justice and Peace Commission in South Africa Calls for a More Effective Regulation of Banks.


sacbc-jnp-logobishop-a-gabuzaBishop Abel Gabuza, the chairperson of SACBC Justice and Peace Commission, has called on the Parliament’s Standing Committee on Finance to consider further regulation of banks if the banks are found guilty of collusion by the competition tribunal.

“If the tribunal confirms commission’s findings, we urge the treasury and the standing committee on finance to institute more effective regulation of banks, in furtherance of the common good, to prevent further market abuse.” Says Bishop Gabuza.

According to Bishop Gabuza, this should include efforts to speed up the finalisation of the Financial Regulation Bill. “We particularly insist on the establishment of the market conduct regulator.” 

Bishop Gabuza has commended the standing committee on finance for its efforts to appraise the concentration levels in the banking sector. 

“In any sector, when too much power is concentrated in too few hands, the biggest losers are often the poor and low income earners. In so far as it is undertaken in a manner which is consistent with international benchmarks and the interests of the poor, we support government efforts to break the dominance of South Africa’s largest banks and increase access to the economy.”

Bishop has also called for stronger culture of ethics in the banking sector. “The bank collusion is a reminder that we need to strengthen ethical infrastructure in the financial sector. We are often worried that, since the banking sector is important for increased investment and faster economic growth, it is often treated as if it is a sector that should be above ethics and the law. Just like other sectors, the banking sector should be subjected to ethical imperatives and regulatory frameworks that promote the common good. Profit making and greed should not be the only guiding principles.” Added Bishop Gabuza.

SACBC Justice and Peace Commission “shall continue to speak out against corruption in the financial sector, with the same vigour that we use when we condemn corruption in the public sector. Both private sector corruption and public sector corruption arise from the spirit of greed and the worship of money. Both constitute stealing from the poor. Both divert resources necessary to uplift the poor from poverty and destitution. We shall not therefore remain silent in the face of any corruption and fraud.”

Click here to open the PDF file of this document.

For further information, kindly contact:

Bishop Abel Gabuza. Cell number:  0825494324  –  Phone number: 053 831 1861 or 053 831 1862. Email: dagabuza@gmail.com

Archbishop William Slattery: Cell: 0834685473

Mafrwestafrica lettre du 21 février 2017


Mafrwestafrica logoAujourd’hui, les Missionnaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest vous proposent de visiter de nouvelles pages sur leur site http://www.mafrwestafrica.net.

Actualités

« Relais Pères Blancs Maghreb janvier 2017 » la dernière édition disponible de cette revue qui nous informe sur l’Eglise en Afrique du Nord (lire la suite)

« Les missionnaires d’aujourd’hui » même s’ils ont la même mission, ne se présentent plus de la même manière que par le passé (lire la suite)

Témoignages 

« Les congrégations missionnaires africanisent leurs structures », étant de plus en plus dirigées par des africains (lire la suite)

« Jubilaires 2017 chez les missionnaires d’Afrique », les noms de ceux qui célébreront cette année de 25 à 75 ans de serment missionnaire… (lire la suite)

« Nombre de migrants en évolution » le partage de l’expérience des migrants recueilli de par le monde et très enrichissant (lire la suite)

« Le pape pour la journée mondiale du malade » l’intégralité du message du pape François à ce propos (lire la suite)

Dialogue interreligieux

« Social et religieux chez les musulmans » Lire l’interview de Didier Leschi par Walid Mebarek : l’action de l’état a atteint ses limites (lire la suite)

« Nombre et répartition des musulmans dans le monde », un article de Marc Gaborieau, anthropologue auteur de ‘’ Un autre islam : Inde, Pakistan, Bangladesh’’ (lire la suite)

Justice et Paix

« Le pape contre la traite des enfants » tout particulièrement en cette date du 8 février, qui est aussi la fête de Sainte Bakhita (lire la suite)

« Devenir acteurs de notre vie » une invitation du Père Norbert Angibaud, référent Justice et Paix des Missionnaires d’Afrique de France (lire la suite)

« Migrants aux portes de l’Espagne » plusieurs centaines de migrants ont réussi à pénétrer à Ceuta, cette enclave espagnole au Maroc, malgré les murs et barbelés (lire la suite)

Vu au Sud – Vu du Sud

« Rénovation d’une école à Khartoum » un article d’un missionnaire Burkinabè y résidant et témoignant de l’aide apportée à ce projet (lire la suite)

« Autorités intérimaires Nord Mali » : les présidents de ces autorités ont été désignés et entrent en fonction le 18 février 2017 (lire la suite)

« Les casques bleus ont quitté la RCI » après quatorze ans de présence sur le sol ivoirien, dans l’espoir que la stabilité fera un retour durable dans ce pays (lire la suite)

Integrity of Creation in Kasamba, Zambia


integrity-of-creation-01blogBy Benjamin Itungabose, M.Afr

Like elsewhere the phenomenon of deforestation raises a lot of concerns in Zambia. People cut down trees for various reasons. Due to the current electricity problems in cities people use charcoal as their source of energy more than ever before. Hence burning charcoal has become the main source of income for people in rural areas. Thousands of bags of charcoal are taken to Lusaka and Copperbelt day and night. Luapula province which used to be a land of vegetation is gradually losing its identity.

As Missionaries of Africa working in Kasamba, we felt that we had to do something about this phenomenon. In view of raising awareness about the care of our environment, last year we undertook a tree planting project in our Parish. So far we have planted about 3,500 pine trees. We wish to extend this project to at least 10,000 trees in the coming years.

What is more encouraging is that the people of Kasamba are now becoming aware of the importance of planting trees. At the end of last year Caritas Mansa gave to each parish 200 seedlings of pine trees to give to their members.  Personally I was amazed to see how people literally fought over those seedlings. Because of this increasing interest in planting trees we are planning together with the Justice and Peace group of Kasamba to have a seminar about how to make nurseries in order to produce more seedlings. In this way we hope that our mission of caring for our environment will extend to the entire Parish and hopefully to the entire Diocese.

integrity-of-creation-02blogintegrity-of-creation-03blog

This article was translated into French on ‘Église & Écologie’ (E&E) blog. Please, click on the link or on the logo for more information.

eglise-ecologie-logo

FORETS – Donne nous nos pins quotidiens

Publié le 26 février 2017

La Zambie est, elle aussi, touchée par la déforestation. Des religieux missionnaires d’Afrique ont décidé de réagir, du côté de Kasamba. Ils témoignent de leur mobilisation sur leur site (en anglais)

« Les gens coupent les arbres pour différentes raisons. Du fait des coupures d’électricité dans les villes, les gens utilisent le charbon de bois comme source d’énergie plus que jamais. De plus, ce charbon de bois devient ainsi la principale source de revenus dans les zones rurales. Des milliers de chargements de charbon de bois sont emmenés vers Lusaka et Copperbelt, jour et nuit. Du coup, la province de Luapula qui était une terre de végétation, est en train de perdre son identité. Comme missionnaires d’Afrique travaillant à Kasamba, nous avons ressenti que nous devions faire quelque chose. Pour faire grandir la prise de conscience sur les défis de la protection de l’environnement, nous avons entrepris depuis un an un projet de reforestation dans notre paroisse. Nous avons déjà planté 3500 arbres et nous espérons arriver à 10 000 dans les années à venir. Ce qui est le plus encourageant, c’est que les gens de Kasamba commencent à comprendre notre démarche. A la fin de l’année dernière, l’association Caritas Mansa a donné 200 plants de pins à chaque paroisse, pour les distribuer à leurs membres. J’étais étonné de voir comment les gens se sont disputés pour en avoir. Nous envisageons maintenant d’organiser un colloque pour créer une pépinière pour produire davantage de plants. Nous espérons ainsi que notre soin de l’environnement sera repris pour toute la paroisse voire notre diocèse en entier. »

m-afr-logo-web-romeÉgalement disponible sur le site des Missionnaires d’Afrique à Rome :

Intégrité de la Création à Kasamba (Zambie)

Religious Extremism and Violence in Tanzania


translation-into-german-religioser-extremismus-missio-2By Elias O. Opongo, SJ and Felix J Phiri, M.Afr

In an extensive and critical research about the present religious situation in Tanzania our confrere Felix Phiri [1], the Director of the Islamic studies in the Tangaza University of Nairobi together with Elias Opongo, SJ, the Director of the Hekima Institute of Peace Studies in Nairobi have published a case study about the increasing religious extremism and violence in Tanzania which was proposed and financed by MISSIO Germany.

The authors analyse the situations of conflict in the country: their historical background which evolved into the recent increasing tensions between Moslems and Christians. Through their intensive interaction with Christian and Muslim believers the authors show the many causes of growing radicalism and violence on both sides and the various supports they get for their activities.

But they also outline possible solutions to a peaceful coexistence of the two main religions in the country where approximately 45% are Moslems, 35% Christians and 20% followers of Traditional Religion.

The findings of this research are to a large extent also relevant in looking for a peaceful and hoped for resolution in similar situations in other African countries.

The German edition of this Research is published under “Menschenrechte”, “Religióser Extremismus und Gewalt in Tanzania”. Both the German and the English editions are published by MISSIO Aachen 2016. (ISSN 1618-6222).

[1] Currently the new Provincial of the Southern Africa Province (SAP).

Silver Jubilee of Chimoio Diocese and the blessing of its new cathedral – Mozambique


silver-jubilee-of-chimoio-diocese-10bBy Boris Yabre, M.Afr

On Sunday 12th February, the Diocese of Chimoio celebrated its 25 years of existence by blessing the newly built cathedral. The Bishops of Beira, Maputo and Quelimane together with thousands of Christians who came to express their support to Bishop João Francisco Silota, the first Bishop of Chimoio Diocese and thanking God for this achievement.

In his homily, Bishop Silota presented a financial report of local and foreign contributions for the construction of the cathedral. Before the final blessing, he made public his last will to be buried in the cathedral. “If I died in or outside Mozambique or even in another continent, if nothing prevent it, I would like to be buried in this cathedral.” Then, leaving the altar and going down to the main entrance, he showed in a dramatic manner the place of his future resting place. The successor of Bishop Silota will be enthroned on 12th March 2017. We recommend him to your prayers.

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Death of Father Pierre Lemoyne, M.Afr


lemoyne-pierre2-copieFather Gilles Barrette, Provincial of the Americas, informs you of the death o Father Pierre Lemoyne, M.Afr.

He died on February 17, 2017, in Asbestos (Canada), at the age of 90 years of which 63 of missionary life in Zambia and Canada.

Let us pray for the repose of his soul.

Some communities in Zambia where Father Lemoyne lived: Mbala, Kasama, Chipata, Lubushi, Lwena, Ipusukilo, Kapatu, Kantensha, Ilondola, Ndola, Mufulira.

Farewell of the MSOLA Sisters – Regiment Parish, Lusaka, Zambia.


farewell-zambia-feb-2017-22bA farewell Mass was celebrated at Regiment Parish on Sunday, February 12, 2017, to honour the  (MSOLA). Two Bishops were present, namely the Auxiliary Bishop of Chipata, Tr. Rev Benjamin S. Phiri and Bishop of Mpika, Tr. Rev Justin Mulenga together with the Archbishop of Lusaka, Most Rev Thelesphore-George Mpundu. Many Sisters of four Congregations, namely the Sisters of the Child Jesus, the Theresian sisters, the Daughters of the Redeemer and the Bethany Sisters were also present to thank them for the help and formation the MSOLA provided when they were established, like the Theresian Sisters in 1927.

100-years-in-zambia-msolabWere honoured: Sisters Marie-Ange Ndayishimiye, Vickness Nangogo Muleya, Flora Ridder, Victoire Niyonzima and Revocate Kabahuma.

This was the last chapter not written in a book published in 2002 to commemorate 100 years of the MSOLA in Zambia. Altogether, they have been in this country for 115 years. See below presentation of the MSOLA presented by Sister Vickness Nangogo Muleya at the beginning of the Mass which illustrates the variety of ministerial work they did over those years. We ask the blessing of the Lord upon them all as their mission will move to other African countries such as Uganda, Tanzania and Burundi.

Thanksgiving of Service of the Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of Africa in Zambia 12th February 2017.

Today we gather to celebrate the service and presence of the MSOLA in Zambia as well as bidding farewell to you and the country at large.We were founded by Cardinal Lavigerie in the year 1869 in Algeria, a year after founding the Society of Missionaries of Africa (White Fathers). We first arrived in Zambia in 1902 at Chilubula in the Northern Province of Zambia. We have worked in the dioceses of Kasama, Mansa, Chipata, Ndola, Mpika, Lusaka and Solwezi.

From 1902 to 2017 – 115 Years: The sisters have been involved in education, health and pastoral services such as:

  • St. Theresa Girls Secondary School in Chilubula
  • Santa Maria Health Centre in Chilubi Island
  • Minga Teachers Training College and Minga Hospital Eastern Province
  • Lubwe Mission Hospital in Luapula
  • Catechism and home craft centres to mention but a few.
  • We also concentrated on the formation of leaders in the Local Church such as
  • Formation of Small Christian Communities Leaders
  • Catechists
  • Coordinating of On-Going Formation e.g.  at Kalundu Centre
  • Facilitation of chapters for different congregations.

The development of women and youth through programs such as Youth Alive, literacy classes and carried out many other pastoral activities in parishes. We are glad for the privilege to have been part of the formators at the beginning of the:

  • Sisters of the Child Jesus,
  • The Theresian sisters
  • The Daughters of the Redeemer and
  • The Bethany Sisters

Lusaka Archdiocese:

We worked at national level at the Catholic secretariat and Zambia Association of Sisterhood. Apart from that, we initiated small Christian communities, taught at Kabulonga Girls Secondary School and schools of higher education such as University Teaching Hospital School of Nursing and Evelyn Hone College. We served as chaplains at Universities E.g. University Teaching Hospital, University of Zambia, Copperbelt University, etc.

Ministries at Regiment Parish (1966-2017)

We initiated the Xaverians youth movement, Catholic Family Movement, Catholic Action and Legion of Mary, taught religion and catechism in the parish and in the schools, visited the prisons, training of volunteers such as the Zambian Helpers Society, launching of the small Christian community movement in Chilenje and the home-based care.

farewell-zambia-feb-2017-04Presentation of Symbols:

The Candle: the light of Christ that has been the guide to our sisters who lived and were missionaries in Zambia.

The Bible, the word of God is core to evangelisation; the word of God is our source of inspiration and strength to carry on the mission entrusted to us.

Cardinal Lavigerie, the founder of our congregation, was convinced that women have a very important role in evangelisation.

Mother Marie Salome, our first Superior General – stood firm in faith to the challenges of the time to see the congregation flourish.

Our Lady of Africa: from the beginning of the Congregation has entrusted itself under the guidance and protection of Mary Our Lady of Africa.

Zambia: Our land of missions – we have loved and still love Zambia with all its people, land, richness and its challenges; we have loved everything about Zambia.

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